Center on Race and Social Problems

The Pittsburgh Neighborhood Distress & Health Study: Neighborhood Profiles (2015)

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Date published: 
2015

This report provides a snapshot of Pittsburgh’s 90 neighborhoods, with a special focus on the links between neighborhoods, race, and health. The profiles utilized data from the Pittsburgh Neighborhood and Community Information System (PNCIS), a project of the Urban and Regional Analysis Program at University Center for Urban and Social Research.

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This report provides a snapshot of Pittsburgh’s 90 neighborhoods, with a special focus on the links between neighborhoods, race, and health.  For each neighborhood, we have prepared a profile of data and a map to help readers orient themselves. The profiles utilized data from the Pittsburgh Neighborhood and Community Information System (PNCIS), a project of the Urban and Regional Analysis Program at University Center for Urban and Social Research. These data include details on birth outcomes, vacancy, tax delinquency, property ownership, assessment, foreclosure, crime, housing sales, and land use. Data sources include the Allegheny County Health Department, Allegheny County Office of Property Assessments, City of Pittsburgh Police Department, and the United States Postal Service. Additional data from the U.S. decennial Census and American Community Survey provide details on neighborhood population and demographics. All data have been aggregated to match the neighborhood boundaries in the city of Pittsburgh.

Each profile includes a data on a specific neighborhood, a ranking representing that neighborhood compared to the other 90 neighborhoods in the city, and data for the city overall.  Not only does this allow for easy comparison of individual neighborhoods to the city overall, but the profile rankings also provide a sense of where each neighborhoods fits compared to the other neighborhoods across the city.  The rankings range from “1” to “90,” with “1” being the neighborhood with the lowest score and “90” being the neighborhood with the highest score.

A map of the neighborhood compliments the data in each profile to help create a sense of place.  Each map includes key neighborhood features such as business districts, parks and open space, libraries, and schools.  Because no neighborhood exists in a vacuum, it is also important to understand what surrounds the neighborhood.  As a result, we show the bordering neighborhoods on each map with the intention that interested users can flip to the profiles for these areas.

 

Using the Pittsburgh Neighborhood Profiles Report

The profiles provide important context on Pittsburgh neighborhoods that can be used by community organizations, researchers, and professors as a teaching tool for students. For example, the profiles have been used as part of an Urban Studies course at the University of Pittsburgh to provide students with helpful background information on their project in the Lawrenceville neighborhoods.  Researchers at the University have also used the profiles to provide neighborhood context in grant proposals on topics including violence prevention and racial inequality among youth. Most recently, these data were used by the Pittsburgh’s Midwife Center for Birth and Women’s Health to help decide which neighborhoods to target as they expand services throughout the city.

 

The report was developed by Anita Zuberi, PhD, School of Social Work & Center on Race and Social Problems, University of Pittsburgh; Rick Hopkinson, MPA, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh; Bob Gradeck, MCP, University Center for Urban and Social Research, University of Pittsburgh; and Waverly Duck, PhD, Department of Sociology, University of Pittsburgh.

 

If you have questions about the report, please contact: prm15@pitt.edu